Bertram Mills Circus II: Clowning Around, Balancing on Elephants, Riding a Pony, and Taming the American Indian Caricatures

In the second installment (out of three) focused on the wonders of the three VistaScreen series on the Bertram Mills Circus, I document my personal journey over the course of the last couple of years to complete Series 46 - which led to my discovery of two more complete 10-card sets, and to a fascination with VistaScreen. We also delve into the reasons why there are two alternate sets with the same designation - including the theory that some rather racially unacceptable portrayals of American Indians caused the company to change from this relatively quaint "Day Series" to the more formal, and more scarce, "Night Series".

Bertram Mills Circus I: Getting Ready for the Ballyhoo Under the Big Top

Out of love of all things circus, my very first series of images on this blog was VistaScreen C.62 "Bertram Mills Circus". This is more or less a redux of that series, revamped to greatly improve the image quality, display options, and anaglyphs, with some new information. This is the first in a series of three posts focused on 1950s VistaScreen stereography of Britain's answer to RB&BB - Bertram Mills Circus - because who doesn't love the Big Top?

One-shot #30: London Zoo Penguins, by Sunbeam Tours Ltd.

Being delighted to receive this bizarrely-tall thin paper stereoview a few days prior, I failed at the time to realize that it was a more expensive stereo pair than any of the other 1,000+ that I had received during "Christmas in July". And it was totally worth it, because penguins are the best!

30 Boxes of Glass Plates from Belgium: Marie-Noëlle’s Collection, Intro & 2 Boxes

One of the parcels which arrived on "Christmas in July" two days ago contained a wooden box - with about 500 amateur glass stereoviews contained within. Today, we take a look at two boxes at random, in an attempt to determine what this acquisition consists of, who might have taken it, and whether it is, indeed, a cohesive collection, as opposed to a random pile of amateur glass.

Series: “By Car Through Finland. Part I.” – An Introduction to Mikro-Kino Filmstrips

My opinion that Finland is a weird and wonderful place is not tempered by this Mikro-Kino filmstrip, the first I'll be posting of seven I currently own. A barely-known competitor to Tru-Vue, if they can be called a competitor being that they began producing their "filmseries" after Tru-Vue was bought out, Mikro-Kino offers a 3D look at the world of Finland and beyond through Finnish eyes.

Series: Greece in the 1950s

The post-war Raumbild-Verlag Siegfried Brandmüller series "Greece" is primarily focused on ruins, as so many Grecian stereoviews seem to be. Still, they come alive wonderfully in this short series.

Tru-Vue Advertising: The Academy of the Visitation at Villa de Chantal, Series I

It's not surprising that the newly-formed Tru-Vue company of Rock Island, Illinois decided to try their hand in the advertising market. Nor is it surprising that they chose a local institution for one of their first advertising filmstrips. What is surprising is that this early subject was a girls' Catholic school run by the Salesian Sisters - and that the stereo photography is actually pretty darn good, considering!